What Will This Publication Address?

What works in the frum community and what doesn’t?

Are we spending too much for both basics and luxuries? Do we fully understand how our kosher food and mitzva, chasuna, and educational resources are produced and delivered? Do crime, corruption, and dishonesty exist within our communities and are they impacting our lives? Is our tzedaka money well spent? Do changes in the world around us mean that perfecting Torah observance requires fresh perspectives?

Look for articles addressing the impact of developing social trends, worrying developments, and injustice. We're especially interested in deep-dive investigative journalism, where we can assess real-world data and inside information to uncover the full truth behind our stories.

Of course, the good far outweighs the bad around here. While there's always room for improvement, we'd also like to focus on institutions and initiatives on all levels that, against all odds, accomplish great things. Who's finding creative ways to make people happy and ease the lives of the troubled? Who's figured out how to solve old and painful problems? We want to tell those stories, too.

How Will We Work?

We try to be fair, objective, respectful, and most of all responsible about every editorial choice we make. That means we'll never knowingly:

  • Direct readers' attention to an identifiable individual or organization if not absolutely necessary to serve some public good.

  • Unnecessarily compromise the privacy of any individual.

  • Incite controversy unless it's likely the only way to help solve a real problem.

  • Publish plagerized content of any sort.

  • Publish ideas or claims that haven't been confirmed to a reasonable standard.

  • Publish speculative, scandalous, and sensational content to attract cheap attention.

  • Disregard halachic restrictions.

In addition, we only publish our own original content (unless clearly noted). There won't be any cutting and pasting from third-party sites.

Do You Want to Contribute?

Do you have some valuable knowledge or connections on topics that fit our mandate? Feel free to pitch us a story idea. We pay for all stories that we publish (although not as much as we'd like to pay).

Got inside information that could make a difference? Be in touch. You don't need to identify yourself but you should understand that anonymous tips are less credible - especially when they come without corroborating evidence.

How Will Comments Work?

For now at least, we've disabled comments on the site. It's not about our readers, but about problems we've seen on other sites. We're just not comfortable taking that kind of risk.

However, that doesn't mean we don't want to hear your feedback. Please feel free to email us. We may not always be able to respond, but we will read everything we get. And you should know two things about what we do with your emails:

  1. Every now and then we plan to publish a digest of emails that would be particularly useful for the B'chol Darchecha community. By default, we won't include names of the authors. If you do want your name published with your letter, let us know.

  2. We take criticism very seriously. There's a very good chance that we'll at least try hard to implement any good suggestions we receive. Where appropriate and possible, we'll reach out for greater detail and direction.

What Does "B'chol Derachecha" Mean?

The phrase actually comes from Mishlei 3:6.

"In all your ways you should know Him, so He will straighten your paths"

"All your ways." Everything you do. Your business and professional dealings, family life, community relationships, relaxation - all of those must be engaged with an eye to how God's will can be furthered and how God's Torah can be more deeply integrated into our aspirations.

So is it any surprise that the full scope of our social behavior must be measured against higher standards? Godliness is about much more than just Torah learning and davening (although it most certainly is about those).

This publication is committed to helping build a community of Jews willing to look both around and inward in a search for what can be made better.

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